Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture

  • 101 Replies
  • 16000 Views
Ozmiander's Avatar

Ozmiander

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #90 on: May 16, 2021, 06:31:01 pm »
.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2021, 06:54:32 pm by Ozmiander »

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #91 on: May 16, 2021, 06:37:29 pm »


Lol, I like all the flamingos in the hugel. Also it's fascinating to see how much more green and lush the hugel is compared to the surrounding grassland. I wonder if they irrigate it

The hugel is designed to absorb and retain water better than flat ground!

Yes, exactly. I want to know if that difference in vegetation is solely due to the existence of a hugel or if it's also being irrigated.
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #92 on: May 17, 2021, 09:51:14 pm »
Quote from: Just Have a Think
Agrophotovoltaics, agrivoltaics, or APV. Just like the name suggests, it's a way of combining photovoltaic solar panels with agriculture. In many parts of the world where fertile land is scarce, agriculture and solar developers have fought over available space. What each party might have been missing all along is that it could be more profitable for both of them if they work together instead. And that may also just be the answer to the existential crisis being faced by so many farms across the United States and around the world.

*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #93 on: June 23, 2021, 11:36:16 pm »
The Poo Princess explains how we can turn a desert into an oasis by using plants to treat wastewater

*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #94 on: July 09, 2021, 04:14:54 am »
25-30 years ago a few hippies pooled their money together to buy 100 acres of degraded farmland in Wisconsin. By following permaculture design principles they've been able to grow enough food to pay off the mortgage, taxes, construction materials for their house, and raise two kids.

They started by planting rows of trees and perennial shrubs to create terraces down the hillside, with annual cash crops growing between the rows of trees. For the first several years they relied on income from the annual cash crops while they waited for the larger fruit and nut trees became established.

*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #95 on: September 20, 2021, 01:43:15 pm »
How to design roads that naturally make people want to slow down instead of just posting a sign and calling it good



It's time to end stroads. We should have streets and roads instead!

« Last Edit: September 21, 2021, 01:58:49 pm by rachel »
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #96 on: October 16, 2021, 07:22:36 pm »
So I guess we should start buying cheap land in the desert 🤔

     
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #97 on: November 07, 2021, 08:19:01 pm »
Grow plants with your pee and poo

Educational Overview of Wastewater Treatment Using Plants


Hour long documentary about an apartment complex that got bought out and turned into a permaculture paradise



Jump to 13 minutes 7 seconds for this banger quote - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCGXVk-cBVk&t=787s
Quote
"So, we recycle pee in bottles. So, I'm gonna show you how we do it. So, these are our urine tanks, and this is 1000 litres or one cubic liter of urine right here."
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #98 on: March 13, 2022, 11:22:18 pm »
If you're going to live in a city, at least plant some trees!



Look at the striking contrast between this building and all of the others around it!

*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #99 on: May 19, 2022, 05:59:30 am »
Potable water is important.
------
Solar-powered desalination device wins MIT $100K competition
Nona Desalination says it has developed a device capable of producing enough drinking water for 10 people at half the cost and with 1/10th the power of other water desalination devices. The device is roughly the size and weight of a case of bottled water and is powered by a small solar panel.
The traditional approach for water desalination relies on a power-intensive process called reverse osmosis. In contrast, Nona uses a technology developed in MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics that removes salt and bacteria from seawater using an electrical current.
The company has already developed a small prototype that produces clean drinking water. With its winnings, Nona will build more prototypes to give to early customers.
The company plans to sell its first units to sailors before moving into the emergency preparedness space in the U.S., which it estimates to be a $5 billion industry. From there, it hopes to scale globally to help with disaster relief. The technology could also possibly be used for hydrogen production, oil and gas separation, and more.

https://news.mit.edu/2022/portable-desalination-drinking-water-0428

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #100 on: May 28, 2022, 11:09:56 pm »
Potable water is important.
------
Solar-powered desalination device wins MIT $100K competition
Nona Desalination says it has developed a device capable of producing enough drinking water for 10 people at half the cost and with 1/10th the power of other water desalination devices. The device is roughly the size and weight of a case of bottled water and is powered by a small solar panel.
The traditional approach for water desalination relies on a power-intensive process called reverse osmosis. In contrast, Nona uses a technology developed in MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics that removes salt and bacteria from seawater using an electrical current.
The company has already developed a small prototype that produces clean drinking water. With its winnings, Nona will build more prototypes to give to early customers.
The company plans to sell its first units to sailors before moving into the emergency preparedness space in the U.S., which it estimates to be a $5 billion industry. From there, it hopes to scale globally to help with disaster relief. The technology could also possibly be used for hydrogen production, oil and gas separation, and more.

https://news.mit.edu/2022/portable-desalination-drinking-water-0428

woah, portable low-energy electric salt & bacteria filters? that sounds way better than having to constantly replace carbon filters! or heating up water to the boiling point (distillation) or pumping the water to really high pressures (reverse osmosis)

Quote
The resulting water exceeded World Health Organization quality guidelines, and the unit reduced the amount of suspended solids by at least a factor of 10. Their prototype generates drinking water at a rate of 0.3 liters per hour, and requires only 20 watt-hours per liter.

WOW!  only 20 watts for a litre of clean water and you can get water from anywhere. it removes turbidity and salts


« Last Edit: May 28, 2022, 11:18:02 pm by rachel »
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #101 on: October 22, 2022, 09:07:44 am »
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A renewable energy plant in Oregon that combines solar power, wind power and massive batteries to store the energy generated there officially opened Wednesday as the first utility-scale plant of its kind in North America.

The project, which can generate enough electricity to power a small city at maximum output, addresses a key challenge facing the utility industry as the U.S. transitions away from fossil fuels and increasingly turns to solar and wind farms for power. Wind and solar are clean sources of power, but utilities have been forced to fill in gaps when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining with fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

At the Oregon plant, massive lithium batteries store up to 120 megawatt-hours of power generated by the 300-megawatt wind farms and 50-megawatt solar farm so it can be released to the electric grid on demand. At maximum output, the facility can produce more than half of the power that was generated by Oregon’s last coal plant, which was demolished earlier this month.

On-site battery storage isn’t new, and interest in solar-plus-battery projects in particular has soared in the U.S. in recent years due to robust tax credits and incentives and the falling price of batteries. The Wheatridge Renewable Energy Facility in Lexington, Oregon, however, is the first in the U.S. to combine integrated wind, solar and battery storage at such a large scale in one location, giving it even more flexibility to generate continuous output without relying on fossil fuels to fill in the gaps.