Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture

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Ozmiander

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #90 on: May 16, 2021, 06:31:01 pm »
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« Last Edit: May 16, 2021, 06:54:32 pm by Ozmiander »

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #91 on: May 16, 2021, 06:37:29 pm »


Lol, I like all the flamingos in the hugel. Also it's fascinating to see how much more green and lush the hugel is compared to the surrounding grassland. I wonder if they irrigate it

The hugel is designed to absorb and retain water better than flat ground!

Yes, exactly. I want to know if that difference in vegetation is solely due to the existence of a hugel or if it's also being irrigated.
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Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #92 on: May 17, 2021, 09:51:14 pm »
Quote from: Just Have a Think
Agrophotovoltaics, agrivoltaics, or APV. Just like the name suggests, it's a way of combining photovoltaic solar panels with agriculture. In many parts of the world where fertile land is scarce, agriculture and solar developers have fought over available space. What each party might have been missing all along is that it could be more profitable for both of them if they work together instead. And that may also just be the answer to the existential crisis being faced by so many farms across the United States and around the world.

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Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #93 on: June 23, 2021, 11:36:16 pm »
The Poo Princess explains how we can turn a desert into an oasis by using plants to treat wastewater

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Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #94 on: July 09, 2021, 04:14:54 am »
25-30 years ago a few hippies pooled their money together to buy 100 acres of degraded farmland in Wisconsin. By following permaculture design principles they've been able to grow enough food to pay off the mortgage, taxes, construction materials for their house, and raise two kids.

They started by planting rows of trees and perennial shrubs to create terraces down the hillside, with annual cash crops growing between the rows of trees. For the first several years they relied on income from the annual cash crops while they waited for the larger fruit and nut trees became established.

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