water appreciation thread

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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #45 on: January 22, 2022, 11:33:02 pm »
Lots of scientists and hydrologists from the Bureau of Land Management in Colorado have been mimicing beaver by building beaver dam analogues to restore wetland habitats in national parks!!

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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #46 on: February 14, 2022, 11:55:45 am »
love water. been ddehydrated all weekend and finally managing to keep some in me! thank u water

Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #47 on: February 14, 2022, 11:38:36 pm »
today i took a bath. it was relaxing

Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #48 on: June 11, 2022, 06:45:16 pm »
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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #49 on: June 26, 2022, 11:40:27 pm »
Was looking into some of the newer water from air technologies, came across this gem:

https://interestingengineering.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-air-to-water-devices

Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #50 on: June 28, 2022, 01:00:51 am »
Was looking into some of the newer water from air technologies, came across this gem:

https://interestingengineering.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-air-to-water-devices

I've heard of fog nets before but most of the new things on this list are pretty interesting!

Ironically the last one on the list turned out to be vaporware. They ran out of money from their Indiegogo campaign and never made it to production.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/fontus-the-self-filling-water-bottles#/updates/all

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9. These water bottles can refill themselves from the very air around them

Yet another interesting AWG is a self-refilling water bottle called the Fontus Airo. Ideal for people who love nothing more than the great outdoors, these bottles can refill themselves in less than an hour.

Sometimes when things sound too good to be true... they are

Edit: Lol I just noticed they have "9." twice, there is no "10." in this list xD
« Last Edit: June 28, 2022, 01:18:32 am by rachel »
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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #52 on: July 21, 2022, 12:21:04 am »
Bro wtf we are literally causing climate change through land use changes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico_City

It used to snow in Mexico City but then they drained all of the lakes and now it doesn't anymore

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Snow falls in the city very rarely, although somewhat more often in nearby mountain tops. Throughout its history, the Central Valley of Mexico was accustomed to having several snowfalls per decade (including a period between 1878 and 1895 in which every single year—except 1880—recorded snowfalls[94]) mostly lake-effect snow. The effects of the draining of Lake Texcoco and global warming have greatly reduced snowfalls after the snow flurries of 12 February 1907.[95] Since 1908, snow has only fallen three times, snow on 14 February 1920;[96] snow flurries on 14 March 1940;[97] and on 12 January 1967, when 8 centimeters (3 in) of snow fell on the city, the most on record.[98] The 1967 snowstorm coincided with the operation of Deep Drainage System that resulted in the total draining of what was left of Lake Texcoco.[94][99] After the disappearance of Lake Texcoco, snow has never fallen again over Mexico City.[94]
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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #53 on: July 29, 2022, 11:44:06 pm »
Flash Flood Front Wall Intercept in Rimrock Arizona, skip to 3m for the moneyshot

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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #54 on: August 04, 2022, 05:30:32 pm »
Glen Canyon Dam is an antique and soon won't be able to supply any water downstream because it was never designed to be operated during a drought.......



oopsie

https://www.8newsnow.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/59/2022/08/AntiquePlumbingatGlenCanyonDam.pdf



There's way less water than the govt predicted we'd have. I guess climate change is real now

But it's fine because this dam doesn't even need to exist anymore. The hydro generation capacity is outdated and practically useless

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To date, we are aware of only one study that examines what effects losing hydropower at Glen Canyon Dam would have on the American Southwest: The Impact of the Loss of Electric Generation at Glen Canyon Dam by Power Consulting and Aesir Consulting. The study found that “the average annual value of Glen Canyon Dam’s electric energy represents less than one half of one percent of the sales value from electric generation in the western grid, and that the grid could readily absorb the loss of hydropower from the dam” and that “average yearly cost increases would be $.08 per month for residential customers, $.59 per month for commercial customers, and $6.16 per month for industrial customers of Glen Canyon Dam electricity.” In other words, the study found that losing electricity generation at Glen Canyon Dam would not have a significant effect on the electrical grid of the Western US or on individual consumer’s power bills.
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Re: water appreciation thread
« Reply #55 on: August 10, 2022, 04:10:20 pm »
"Why are there flash floods after a drought?  Shouldn't the ground want to absorb all the water it's missing?"
Nope, and Dr Rob Thompson shows us how.