BEES!

  • 28 Replies
  • 2206 Views
Re: BEES!
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2019, 11:57:40 AM »

DIABOLIZER TIPPED 128 CORAL FOR THIS POST

*spork*

Re: BEES!
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2020, 07:55:28 PM »

RACHEL TIPPED FOR THIS POST

RACHEL TIPPED FOR THIS POST


Re: BEES!
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2020, 05:33:00 AM »


Are each of those yellow spots a bee?
aka luke

Re: BEES!
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2020, 05:39:54 AM »


Are each of those yellow spots a bee?

Yes. Last year we had a wild swarm move into one of our empty hives
*spork*

Re: BEES!
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2020, 09:48:45 AM »


Are each of those yellow spots a bee?

Yes. Last year we had a wild swarm move into one of our empty hives

that's so freakin cool. I wonder how they decided it was the perfect place, was it the smell of old honey or something?

Re: BEES!
« Reply #20 on: June 05, 2020, 02:25:59 PM »


Are each of those yellow spots a bee?

Yes. Last year we had a wild swarm move into one of our empty hives

that's so freakin cool. I wonder how they decided it was the perfect place, was it the smell of old honey or something?

Yeah they probably scouted it out and were like "hey there's a bunch of honey and shit already here, let's move in". It's actually a pretty common thing for beekeepers to leave "bait hives" in trees in the hopes that they'll catch a wild swarm.

It was intense. I walked out of my room to get a drink from the fridge downstairs and as I passed by the door to the deck I heard a strange buzzing sound. I looked outside and realized there were thousands of dots in the sky and I was like "wtf???" so I opened the door and walked outside

As I opened the door I was surrounded by the sound of buzzing. Not very loud, but somehow my brain interpreted it like a huge rattling surface. Imagine a speaker that was 30 feet wide and 50 feet tall.

By the time I took that picture the swarm had already dissipated by 60-70%

The whole event from when I first noticed it to them all casually hanging out in the hive took maybe 30 minutes
*spork*

Re: BEES!
« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2020, 02:30:33 PM »
Literally 15 minutes after that first pic

*spork*

Re: BEES!
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2020, 02:53:37 PM »
that's really freakin cool. so fast!

Re: BEES!
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2020, 05:50:51 AM »

dont fight the bees
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2020, 11:23:10 AM »


im so glad we have video embeds now :)

Re: dont fight the bees
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2020, 12:35:07 PM »


im so glad we have video embeds now :)

dang I wish this clip was like 7 seconds longer
*spork*

BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEES!
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2020, 04:36:01 AM »

Re: BEES!
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2020, 02:02:38 PM »
This thread is solid. Many excellent jokes were had, and new learnings were learned. I hadn't ever seen a bumble bee hive before, neat!

Re: BEES!
« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2020, 11:42:33 AM »
Quote
The scopa of a bee uses electrostatically charged hairs of varying length and shape to collect pollen.  The scopa can vary in shape, size, and location, depending on the type of pollen collected. Scopa tend to have a top layer of long, stiff hair to hold pollen and an underlayer of short, flexible hair to absorb oils. The bottom layer can be made up of separate hairs or hairs branching off the upper layer. Generally, the larger and more interspersed the hairs, the larger the pollen grains that the scopa can hold. Bees that collect small pollen granules have denser, multibranched scopal hairs compared to bees specialized for large grains.

The scopa is often found on the hind legs, characterized by dense rows of hair. The scopa may also be found on the underside of the abdomen, such as in the Megachilidae family. Pollen caught on other places on the bee, such as the head, can be brushed off using the foreleg using special hairs and packed into the scopa as needed.

The corbicula, or pollen basket, is a specialized scopa that is able to carry both pollen and nectar. The moisture of the nectar allows the pollen to be tightly packed down, increasing the carrying capacity. This kind of scopa is found on more familiar bees like honey bees and bumblebees.

Some bees lack a scopa entirely, such as kleptoparasitic bees which lay their eggs in the nests of other bees and have no need to forage for pollen. Other bees ingest the pollen instead, storing it in a specialized part of their gut known as the crop.

https://asknature.org/?s=bees