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Discussion Forums => General Discussion => Topic started by: rachel on February 06, 2017, 04:39:59 PM

Title: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on February 06, 2017, 04:39:59 PM
Hey y'all, let's talk about permaculture.

If you don't already know, here's some cool links on the topic:

Anyway, for everyone else that already knows all about permaculture, check out this awesome DIY / small scale hydroelectric site (http://www.five-gallon-bucket-hydroelectric.org/) that snek showed me. It's complete with plans and a lot of information about how to generate hydro power at home.

(http://www.five-gallon-bucket-hydroelectric.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Bucketrevealed2.jpg)

http://www.five-gallon-bucket-hydroelectric.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/FIve-Gallon-Bucket-Hydroelectric-Generator-Build-Manual-.pdf
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: JuniperToxic on February 15, 2017, 07:25:21 AM
I got bees I got bees I got bees

Tomorrow is a bee meeting!  After that I will buy my hive boxes and start building it out.

Proposed naming schema is SOURCE ALPHABET_NAME SEQUENCE or SOURCE ALPHABET_NAME YEAR ie

Package Alice 1
Nuc Ayria 1

P Alice 17
P Bailey 17

I might go with the year because the alphabetical sequence will indicate what number of the family they are.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on February 21, 2017, 02:18:01 AM
I got bees I got bees I got bees

Tomorrow is a bee meeting!  After that I will buy my hive boxes and start building it out.

Nice! Can't wait to see pictures
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on February 21, 2017, 02:18:20 AM
Food preservation is just as important as food creation: http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2017/02/vietnams-low-tech-fermentation-food-system-takes-advantage-of-decay.html
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on March 13, 2017, 02:02:08 AM
Check out this awesome Hobbit house!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ix11VQ8f7uY
(also dat booty)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on April 05, 2017, 04:15:22 PM
I have a farming playlist on youtube with videos about agroforestry, vertical aquaponics, and all sorts of garden experiments!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLtV3jb9k2tAZRA5xbMhi2QctL7Ujmvnz

(https://img.youtube.com/vi/zkadNxTDk_c/maxresdefault.jpg) (https://img.youtube.com/vi/ZjnDAQnCeIo/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on April 15, 2017, 06:09:09 AM
Man!! I just got all these tubes and connectors from the homo depo but then I noticed a couple of them had STATE OF CALIFORNIA warnings on them, so I decided to look into the materials used by each company.

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Ijes0DbUopY/TiYblC9yVcI/AAAAAAAAANg/gHzDq9z8ZXE/s1600/_DSC0045.JPG)

Turns out those porous soaker hose things are made from recycled car tire rubber, which often have some amount of heavy metals. I can't find any information on the specific material composition or if any tests have been done to measure the lead levels in the rubber or what happens to water that flows through it, especially in the hot summer sun. I suppose I could call the company, but part of me just wants to avoid it altogether.

The connectors are Acetal plastic, aka Polyoxymethylene which in some cases has been approved for use with food and is used in K'Nex, buttttt...... it reacts with mineral acids and chlorine found in common tap water leading to degradation over time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyoxymethylene#Degradation Planned obsolescence?

Fortunately the plain irrigation tubing is made from Low Density Polyethylene which is commonly used in food safe applications, but it "contains a minimum of 2% concentrated carbon black resin antioxidant" ... whatever that is. They say it helps prevent thermal damage in the sun.

I think I'm going to use the LDPE irrigation tubing I have now but replace the connectors with HDPE connectors from a local medical supply company.

(https://www.eldonjames.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/EJ_T0-3_BLACK.1084.jpg)

Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on April 16, 2017, 11:09:38 AM
permaculture is sexy and cool

ldpe and hdpe (low density poly ethylene, and high density) are the shit. hard as fuck to glue, tho.

if someone made an hdpe 3d printer, i'd take 3d printers seriously.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on April 16, 2017, 10:02:22 PM
permaculture is sexy and cool

ldpe and hdpe (low density poly ethylene, and high density) are the shit. hard as fuck to glue, tho.

if someone made an hdpe 3d printer, i'd take 3d printers seriously.

The problem with HDPE is that it shrinks considerably while cooling and does not adhere to itself, making it pretty much impossible to use extrusion printing. Source: http://reprap.org/wiki/HDPE

It might be possible to 3d print HDPE parts using the same method as clay / metal printing where the material is powdered and mixed with a binder. A laser shoots the powder, making the glue binder melt, creating a fragile 3d object. After the print is finished you throw it in a kiln to melt everything together permanently.

Oh hey, actually it's already a thing if you have a state of the art machine: http://www.plastics.gl/processing-misc/new-hdpe-powder-for-the-laser-sintering-market/
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on April 28, 2017, 12:56:14 PM
That radical heron just posted this link on IRC - http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/a-plan-to-turn-hiawatha-golf-course-into-minneapolis-first-food-forest/416059773

Quote
Put simply, a food forest is a woodland that uses native trees, shrubs, and plants that are both edible and medicinal. The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea.

Intended to be low-maintenance and self-maintaining once established, the plants are designed to not only build soil but to attract pollinators.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Black T Cat on April 28, 2017, 01:37:10 PM
putting the Perma in Cult since this guy https://skepteco.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/the-cult-of-perma/

do any permies here do numbers?

Quote
Permies just don?t do numbers
-Peter Harper The Big Rock Candy Mountain 2013

Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: kayimbo on May 03, 2017, 12:49:16 AM
putting the Perma in Cult since this guy https://skepteco.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/the-cult-of-perma/

do any permies here do numbers?

Quote
Permies just don?t do numbers
-Peter Harper The Big Rock Candy Mountain 2013

That article would be way more helpful if they did the numbers and showed it to us, instead of quoting one guy who said he didn't care about the numbers.

Also, i don't know any thing about hydroponic growing but i think its all about aquaponics.   Red Claw Crayfish are an  ideal source of protein.
Quote
Breeds easily, with no larval stage development.
Potential for selective breeding; many wild population strains.
Tolerates high stocking densities.
Requires low protein diet, not reliant on fishmeal.
Market position as a high value crustacean.
Flesh texture and flavour compares favourably with other crustaceans.
Meat recovery rate acceptable.
Reaches commercial size in nine months grow-out.
Survives well out of water for transport to market.
Straightforward production technology.
Tolerant of variations in water quality - low dissolved oxygen, wide daily pH changes, low alkalinity, temperature variations, high nutrient loads.
Tolerates saline water up to 5 ? indefinitely and up to 15 ? for several days. This provides broad geographic potential and a means of enhancing flavour, purging and cleaning before sending to market.
No destructive burrowing.
Non aggressive ? cannibalism not regarded as an issue.

They like to live in kiddy pools:
(http://atlaspub.20m.com/gh1.jpg)
(http://farmingcrawfish.com/crawfish_redclaw_crayfish/crawfish_pictures/p7ssm_img_1/fullsize/MVC-002S_fs.jpg)

Can anyone suggest a good fish to integrate with aquaponics?

once china kills all the fish in the world, the cornstone of nutrition is gonna be:
a) crayfish
b) algae
c) ... i dunno some sort of plants


Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Black T Cat on May 07, 2017, 08:33:02 PM
d) insects.

http://rmmr.co/index.php/about/
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: kayimbo on May 07, 2017, 11:59:16 PM
I'm very interested in insect farming!  The downside is crickets are still not really economical, its something like 40$ a lb for cricket flour.  Not cheap.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: what on May 09, 2017, 08:50:56 PM
There is a permanent culture growing on my ballsack is that the same thing? It doesn't go away even after years of showers
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 14, 2017, 07:34:44 AM
Friends, the Los Cedros Biological Reserve is under serious threat.

The Ecuadorean government has secretly signed a mining agreement covering Los Cedros and other ?protected? areas with the Canadian company ?Cornerstone Capital Resources inc?, a large speculative fund which doesn?t do any mining itself but employs local small time operators until the big sell off to some real mining company.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2N26Qc1KAUU
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 14, 2017, 08:25:30 AM
I found they have a fundraiser... and it's already over 100% funded!!

http://www.fundmyplanet.org/projects/save-los-cedros

But wait there's more

Quote
SEND A LETTER OF PROTEST!

Are you angry at Cornerstone? GOOD!

Please write letters of protest to:

Cornerstones CEO: Brooke Macdonald 

Am I doing it right?

(https://lut.im/bix4Y0BOsP/Wkn9vgRUcZX26ezQ.png)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: JuniperToxic on May 15, 2017, 07:10:33 AM
I'm very interested in insect farming!  The downside is crickets are still not really economical, its something like 40$ a lb for cricket flour.  Not cheap.

I don't know how to process them into flour, but crickets are stupidly easily to care for.  You could have fucktons of them in a tank/tower and feed them scrap vegetables.  Just gotta figure out how to remove them and grind them up or whatever.

I think it's expensive because there isn't a huge demand beyond the novelty of the concept; if some big company started putting out cricket flour, it would get cheaper since it could be made by more than just small time operations.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 18, 2017, 04:10:53 AM
A greenhouse is used to filter waste water at a highway rest stop in Vermont.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/58/32/03/583203a3b8c3b073e4e9dd6f0cac32e0.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGmp4Nr0cOA

"The living machine"
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 18, 2017, 06:10:01 AM
And here's a lecture from a researcher that has been using plants for wastewater treatment at several facilities - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOAyMCN2k60

(http://sustainabilityproblems.wikispaces.com/file/view/Living_Machine_Layout.jpg/138059085/547x416/Living_Machine_Layout.jpg) (https://lut.im/yTmYv0RTVY/SNKqNw6DwYVt1aSl.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 29, 2017, 03:59:29 PM
putting the Perma in Cult since this guy https://skepteco.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/the-cult-of-perma/

do any permies here do numbers?

Quote
Permies just don?t do numbers
-Peter Harper The Big Rock Candy Mountain 2013

Hey, I finally took the time to read this article and it makes some very interesting points. I think using the scientific method is incredibly important, and obviously the goal should be to grow as much food as possible, but at the same time we can't ignore the effects that chemical fertilizer runoff has on the ecosystem as a whole.

This woman, Dr Elaine Ingham, has spent decades studying soil ecosystems and the effects chemical fertilizer has on the microbes and fungi that form symbiotic relationships with plants - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2H60ritjag

I think it's shortsighted to say that contemporary industrial farming is the pinnacle of human achievement when despite the high yields, half of all food produced still gets wasted. It could be argued that because of all the waste in industrial farming, smaller scale gardening only needs to be 50% - 75% as efficient as industrial farming because we're cutting out transportation / consumer distribution losses.

If you want to see my numbers, check out the wetfish harvest page: https://wiki.wetfish.net/harvest

So far in 2017 our 0.01 acre garden has produced 0.15% of my annual food consumption. I'm shooting for 5% of my food consumption this year. Last year I produced roughly 1% of my annual food consumption. (Food consumption based on averages provided by http://www.nationalgeographic.com/what-the-world-eats/)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 29, 2017, 04:04:20 PM
Also here's a pic of my baby strawberries <3

(https://lut.im/u9a3lf1c2a/FTKG73yQdNRPCBtA.jpg)

So far there's over 60 baby strawberries and over 20 flowers still waiting to be pollinated
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on June 28, 2017, 05:05:12 AM
This guy has a food forest permaculture garden where he only does 2-4 days of maintenance work per year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MIx5q_zbko
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on June 28, 2017, 05:49:36 AM
Oregon State University did a whole online permaculture course (FOR FREE)

http://open.oregonstate.edu/courses/permaculture/

They already offered this course a couple times in 2016 and this spring in 2017. Maybe they'll do it again this fall or maybe next spring??

Either way, a lot of their course videos can be found on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mwRAf3z9ag

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/0mwRAf3z9ag/maxresdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on July 18, 2017, 12:03:29 AM
Now this is my kind of permaculture

"The tech-filled greenhouses can adjust growing conditions over and over again until they find the combination of light, humidity, and other factors that make the most delicious vegetables. "

https://www.fastcompany.com/40419891/these-food-computers-use-ai-to-make-climate-recipes-for-the-best-tasting-crops

(https://assets.fastcompany.com/image/upload/w_707,f_auto,q_auto:best,fl_lossy/wp-cms/uploads/2017/06/p-1-these-food-computers-use-ai-to-create-open-source-recipes-for-better-crops.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on August 13, 2017, 02:19:43 AM
Hydroponic basil, grown in a mason jar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2aaIwTB1aRY

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/2aaIwTB1aRY/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on August 29, 2017, 06:53:54 PM
Using string as a water wick for plants

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Uyc9q9kQbE

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/0Uyc9q9kQbE/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on August 30, 2017, 10:39:57 AM
Large sections of Berlin have been converted into green spaces dubbed a "sponge city". Instead of using a conventional sewer system, they use vegetation filled ditches and green roofs which capture rain water and slowly release it back into the air, keeping the area significantly cooler than traditional concrete jungles.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWjGGvY65jk

(https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NqIsXQbToNw/VroHoE16_1I/AAAAAAAAArQ/undXh85UaJo/s1600/iStock_000051706738_Small_849x565-72dpi.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on October 05, 2017, 02:45:15 AM
Did you know that carrots get bendy due to a lack of moisture?

If you grow carrots at home or buy them at the store with green tops, be sure to remove the tops before storage. If you don't remove the tops, the leaves will use the root as a reserve water supply, making the carrot dry out faster. For best results, store your carrots in a sealed container in the refrigerator!

Don't let this happen to you!

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/CsssNzKU-ss/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on November 18, 2017, 09:19:10 PM
How To Make Money Farming !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yDUEg4urS4

(https://img.youtube.com/vi/-yDUEg4urS4/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Black T Cat on February 23, 2018, 07:24:12 AM
"no homo" I whisper as I look at my garden of pea plants. The progeny had expressed a 1:2:1 ratio of phenotypes. I am Gregor Mendel.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture (thanks ChrstphrR)
Post by: rachel on November 05, 2018, 09:15:43 PM
This guy in Nebraska grows fruit like oranges and grapes year round in his underground grenhouse

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZD_3_gsgsnk

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/ZD_3_gsgsnk/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: ChrstphrR on November 06, 2018, 12:58:36 AM
I'm going to try and convince my wife to put with buying a place out of town so we can do the greenhouse like that fellow in Nebraska did.

Along with a house, his 45 year old house is geothermal, run nearly the same way as the greenhouse is.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: ChrstphrR on November 08, 2018, 10:40:37 PM
Been digging deeper into this greenhouse thing, and it turns out, Russ, the 85 year old in that video, has a website that details a bit more about his geothermal setup, which well, is just running big ol' thin walled tubing in the ground, and blowing or sucking air through it.

(First link I found...)
https://gardenculturemagazine.com/growing-environment/environmental-control/cost-efficient-geothermal-greenhouse/

(Russ Finch's site)
http://www.citrusinthesnow.com/index.html

And, well, apparently from my reading around, there's less than 20 of these greenhouses in the world.   I'm more fixated on the geothermal-air system, since well I'm SPECTACULARILY cheap, AND it's energy efficient.    The idea of having a house, a workshop/garage, and a greenhouse all heated and cooled off low-grade geothermal energy instead of the norm for Alberta, burning natural gas, or electric via coal-fired generator plants, I could use a tiny amount of electricity to heat/cool all the buildings, and eventually swap that to a small wind or solar setup.

I just have to find the right (building) site, because the wife-person is demanding that there be an existing house to start from :|

I just ordered up the "report" (an E-book of some sort) that details the greenhouse and the other aspects of the design, so I'll comment further on it when I get my copy and read it through.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on November 08, 2018, 10:47:49 PM
Been digging deeper into this greenhouse thing, and it turns out, Russ, the 85 year old in that video, has a website that details a bit more about his geothermal setup, which well, is just running big ol' thin walled tubing in the ground, and blowing or sucking air through it.

(First link I found...)
https://gardenculturemagazine.com/growing-environment/environmental-control/cost-efficient-geothermal-greenhouse/

(Russ Finch's site)
http://www.citrusinthesnow.com/index.html

And, well, apparently from my reading around, there's less than 20 of these greenhouses in the world.   I'm more fixated on the geothermal-air system, since well I'm SPECTACULARILY cheap, AND it's energy efficient.    The idea of having a house, a workshop/garage, and a greenhouse all heated and cooled off low-grade geothermal energy instead of the norm for Alberta, burning natural gas, or electric via coal-fired generator plants, I could use a tiny amount of electricity to heat/cool all the buildings, and eventually swap that to a small wind or solar setup.

I just have to find the right (building) site, because the wife-person is demanding that there be an existing house to start from :|

I just ordered up the "report" (an E-book of some sort) that details the greenhouse and the other aspects of the design, so I'll comment further on it when I get my copy and read it through.

Can I come to Canada and help you? Permablitz (https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/PermaBlitz)!!!
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: ChrstphrR on November 08, 2018, 10:57:12 PM
You'll know when I get a place, I'll be spazzing out about building geothermal trenches and a greenhouse...   OMG, I need to set aside one of my bouts of insomnia to go price out how much an old backhoe will cost off Kijiji...  GAH!

But yeah, when there's a homestead of sorts to possibly call wetfish north, you'll know! :P :)

The wife has a day off in common with me for once, so I might take her around to a few potential places to gauge how she feels about one place vs another.

Countering all the wonderful things, will be ... internet.   Internet outside the built up areas bites.  I may have to balance against that, just as much as apparently a bathroom and kitchen and living room matter a lot to the wife-person.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: ChrstphrR on November 08, 2018, 11:00:00 PM
Also the permablitz sounds nifty.     

I'm half thinking about hugels and berry bushes as a means of making a windbreak for a house if it's on semi-open land.
Though...  it'll be harder to get ahold of old logs.   I might have to opt for a trailer and a hitch on my car, and go scrouging for "useless" timber.

There's too many things to consider. :o
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Joof on November 09, 2018, 12:31:20 AM
I'm wondering what kind of insulation this guy uses for his actual home. I don't doubt that moving large volumes of warmer air would heat a home, but I'm not sure the warm air would stay warm at night. Are the tubes buried? The pressure difference between the warm and cold air could move it through a home, but it sounds like he uses fans.

Earthships use material with high specific heat (and I presume diffusivity? I need some basic thermodynamics knowledge.) Specifically, they fill tires with dirt and let them heat up during the day and it keeps it warm at night. I'd expect this would make it relatively simple to keep it about the average year-round temperature of whatever location. An 'underground' greenhouse is probably going to have a similar effect, but with a bit more variance between night and day.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: woodneko on November 09, 2018, 04:40:17 PM
join #permies on irc
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: ChrstphrR on November 10, 2018, 12:15:20 AM
Did some reading, so I can reply with some knowledge imparted from the read.

I'm wondering what kind of insulation this guy uses for his actual home. I don't doubt that moving large volumes of warmer air would heat a home, but I'm not sure the warm air would stay warm at night. Are the tubes buried? The pressure difference between the warm and cold air could move it through a home, but it sounds like he uses fans.

The tubes are buried, below grade, below the frostline / permafrost if you're REALLY far north or south on the planet.  In around 8 feet deep, where you reach a near constant 50-65F for a ground tempurature.    The greenhouse uses a very simple system of pulling air out of a drainage tile loop buried to that depth.   The tempurature differential between the greenhouse air temp and the loop's air temp (which gets moderated to in around 52F in Russ Finch's greenhouse location).   So, it can heat or cool the air in the entire greenhouse, just by air exchange, pulling it out of the loop, and drawing greenhouse air into the loop and dumping heat into the ground in summer, and pulling heat out of the ground in winter.

What he uses in his house and workshop, is a two stage setup -- which he set up first, the greenhouse came later, apparently.

The same simple ground air tube loop exists, and dumps into an 8x8x8 ft room in the house.  Inside that room, the air temp is moderated to ... somewhat close to 50F, near the 52F the air temp is in the ground after it's been sitting in the tube, in the ground as it gets pulled through.   

Also inside the room is a more conventional heat pump, which pumps refrigerant, and it has a loop that circulates in the house.   And that heats/cools the house.
In a "normal" heat pump installation, it's mounted outside the house, in a climate like, Florida, where they don't have sub-freezing day/night air temperatures often.    So you circulate the refrigerant/coolant loop in the house, and it dumps heat to the outside when it's hot inside, but the same loop also pulls heat from the outside and dumps  it inside, when it's cold enough.    So, there'll still be a bit of angry pixies, aka, electricity used to power the blower fan for the simple air loop, and to power the heat pump.

They'd both be thermostatically controlled, so you're not running them when they're not effective (when air temps are near the 50-55F mark for outside air temps).  That would limit electricity use somewhat.

I didn't get a good feel about how insulated his home was, but he built it in the late 70s, using a few unconventional construction techniques, and the heating system too...
I can make educated guesses, because post-Arab Oil Crisis in the mid 70s, there were a lot of efficient house designs that cropped up.   

Up here in Canada, they had an R-2000 House "design" of sorts (pointing to the future, the year 2000).   My parents designed a house with energy conservation in mind -- longer roof eaves that shaded the windows in summer, but let in sunlight/heat in winter, and radically thicker exterior walls than the norm, and IIRC, they had 10" nominal walls - 2x4 and 2x6 alternating studs, which I do recall *perfectly* were a total pain in the arse to fit insulation batts into.

But, in summer, during the day, at my parents house, there was an easy 8-15F temperature drop versus outside temperatures.   They don't have A/C, nor a heat pump, nor a air-heat exchanger.   Just well insulated walls/roof and good doors and windows.

Earthships use material with high specific heat (and I presume diffusivity? I need some basic thermodynamics knowledge.) Specifically, they fill tires with dirt and let them heat up during the day and it keeps it warm at night. I'd expect this would make it relatively simple to keep it about the average year-round temperature of whatever location. An 'underground' greenhouse is probably going to have a similar effect, but with a bit more variance between night and day.

Earthships rely on thermal mass and passive solar.  The low grade geothermal is an active system, and isn't effective when the daytime temps are near the constant below-frost-line stable ground temperature (in around 50-65F or 8-15C at 8ft and deeper), as described above.   The passive ideas of an earthship work, but they work less well in colder climates. 

My bias against that, other than living at around 52?N of the equator, knowing that I'd be fighting against extreme cold for part of the year, and possibly lacking tree cover at many building sites here... is permitting in my jurisdiction.   I'd consider a go of it otherwise, though then I'd run into resistance from the wife-person over building a house from scratch, from apparently scrap materials.   It's a plus in my books, but i'd have to go through legal hoops to make it happen.   

On the other hand, putting a pipe in the ground, Albertans know all about that already! ;)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on November 10, 2018, 10:11:23 PM
These articles discuss techniques for storing solar energy chemically. Certain chemicals have been found change their molecular structure when exposed to light (Photoexcitation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoexcitation)). These chemicals can be stored for long periods of time and used to generate heat on demand using a catalyst.

Quote
The improved absorptivity of NBD1 (λmax@326[thin space (1/6-em)]nm = 1.3 ? 104 M−1 cm−1) coupled with factors such as a large spectral difference compared to the corresponding QC1, the high photoisomerization quantum yield (61%), the long half-life (t1/2 = 30 days at 25 ?C), and high solubility (cmax = 1.52 M for QC1 in toluene), makes this compound a promising candidate for future MOST applications. In addition, the robustness of a solution of NBD1 was assessed at 85 ?C and is capable of withstanding 43 storage and release cycles with little degradation (0.14% per cycle).

 - Macroscopic heat release in a molecular solar thermal energy storage system (https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2018/ee/c8ee01011k)
 - Liquid Norbornadiene Photoswitches for Solar Energy Storage (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/aenm.201703401?referrer_access_token=9YcTt6ojgAtlLzZWBO83pE4keas67K9QMdWULTWMo8O1PtCZnqbfJAW5Z9Srbybioc_8HGhBn2nQg-OzuOiG6LggdLsro6WgagK3AwoCxU2NB8NqJVkgoRrZHg7SNSS4)

(https://pubs.rsc.org/services/images/RSCpubs.ePlatform.Service.FreeContent.ImageService.svc/ImageService/Articleimage/2018/EE/c8ee01011k/c8ee01011k-f1.gif)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Hyrulean on January 14, 2019, 05:07:55 PM
Also the permablitz sounds nifty.     

I'm half thinking about hugels and berry bushes as a means of making a windbreak for a house if it's on semi-open land.
Though...  it'll be harder to get ahold of old logs.   I might have to opt for a trailer and a hitch on my car, and go scrouging for "useless" timber.

There's too many things to consider. :o

Big ups on the hugels there. I've seen some at work and I can assume they are just even mightier now!
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 05, 2019, 08:14:27 PM
lil seedlings for the garden (week 2)

(https://wiki.wetfish.net/upload/ec8226d5-bbe6-8308-9aa6-2ba7b4cbd925.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on June 22, 2019, 03:25:09 PM
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: ChrstphrR on June 22, 2019, 04:05:47 PM
Interesting take on plastic use on a greenhouse.   Net sum, you'll be ahead vs transporting food from afar.

But, it'd aim you toward a greenhouse design that's more permanent, and has glass windows that would last decades.   Places like Habitat for Humanity ReStores have relatively cheap windows, and scrounging just for old panes, over time, you could build a durable foundation and framework, and convert over piecewise from plastic to glass windows.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on December 31, 2019, 12:34:43 AM
How to turn waste cardboard into 3d shapes

Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on January 30, 2020, 10:36:18 PM
Use beetle larva to eat styrofoam instead of throwing it away :)

Title: HOLY SHIT THATS SO FREAKIN COOL
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on February 01, 2020, 07:07:36 PM
Use beetle larva to eat styrofoam instead of throwing it away :)



WHOA thats a game changer! now i want a worm bin! maybe i can breed them up to eating ALL my plastics, that would own huh
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on February 01, 2020, 07:08:09 PM
Imagine, turning plastic -> worm protein -> chicken -> eggs & meat

this is a real game changer! turning trash into protein! holy shit!
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on February 01, 2020, 07:36:58 PM
Imagine, turning plastic -> worm protein -> chicken -> eggs & meat

this is a real game changer! turning trash into protein! holy shit!

I believe it only works with styrofoam, not all plastic. But still there is a lot of styrofoam in the world
Title: DIY water heater & pressurizer for taking showers on the road
Post by: rachel on March 26, 2020, 06:28:35 PM
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on April 07, 2020, 11:05:00 PM
https://blue-freedom.net/store/

Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on April 25, 2020, 09:39:44 AM
i like some of their products but they don't have spec sheets or model information, no information for engineering. they want pictures of the potential installation site just to give quotes?
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: redheron on May 07, 2020, 12:09:55 AM
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/55ca33aede906198ce504875b30c526e/b1d19539995e1919-d4/s1280x1920/eeaa8affa25810ceda73155d6d9156b46607b4d7.png)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/30b6c9b8b3abf0115174e8c78aa71ee4/b1d19539995e1919-d2/s640x960/2b96523f8f364cf1f131d25b8687cbe0ae956a93.jpg)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/3eb28dd84eb632796c5bfbd7386cd0de/b1d19539995e1919-87/s1280x1920/0cbebabd1c9b8d41e303804a3be2c30d4e076bc8.png)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/4fb622d69d31e63214ebd94381683ebe/b1d19539995e1919-79/s640x960/7d4496054a192781b96c35a502a060450957bc7b.jpg)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/80084702e2bac8251dc9fee002b69937/b1d19539995e1919-9e/s1280x1920/c497950f72e9f40841bca2d219f43f4b4130d929.png)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/2b778d07a556943138785da33cced0ee/b1d19539995e1919-e3/s2048x3072/01414c33fdd482b0b1c791108f69f334e7f9b238.jpg)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/4f6c82df9b47d6023205d77d7e6dee83/b1d19539995e1919-f2/s1280x1920/7c67471951423ed5fd0c966165d89af4eefbf074.png)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 07, 2020, 12:15:17 AM
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/55ca33aede906198ce504875b30c526e/b1d19539995e1919-d4/s1280x1920/eeaa8affa25810ceda73155d6d9156b46607b4d7.png)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/30b6c9b8b3abf0115174e8c78aa71ee4/b1d19539995e1919-d2/s640x960/2b96523f8f364cf1f131d25b8687cbe0ae956a93.jpg)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/3eb28dd84eb632796c5bfbd7386cd0de/b1d19539995e1919-87/s1280x1920/0cbebabd1c9b8d41e303804a3be2c30d4e076bc8.png)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/4fb622d69d31e63214ebd94381683ebe/b1d19539995e1919-79/s640x960/7d4496054a192781b96c35a502a060450957bc7b.jpg)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/80084702e2bac8251dc9fee002b69937/b1d19539995e1919-9e/s1280x1920/c497950f72e9f40841bca2d219f43f4b4130d929.png)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/2b778d07a556943138785da33cced0ee/b1d19539995e1919-e3/s2048x3072/01414c33fdd482b0b1c791108f69f334e7f9b238.jpg)
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/4f6c82df9b47d6023205d77d7e6dee83/b1d19539995e1919-f2/s1280x1920/7c67471951423ed5fd0c966165d89af4eefbf074.png)

Yo this is dope. Wrath of Gnon posts some really interesting stuff. It's like half self-sufficiency, half "go to church, you are a bad person" lol
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Ozmiander on May 07, 2020, 06:24:38 AM
Yet another example of lost techniques.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 07, 2020, 06:58:15 AM
This isn't what I was looking for but it ended up being better anyway.

Why use fence posts when you can just use trees?

Quote
Fenceposts have always baffled me. Why would anyone take a perfectly good tree, cut it down, dig a hole to set it in, and then spend the next 20 years watching it decay? In my early days of agroforestry work in the tropics, it was assumed that all fenceposts should be living as a hedge against termites and decay.

https://northernwoodlands.org/articles/article/living-fenceposts

(https://northernwoodlands.org/images/made/images/articles/fence_post3_400_493_80.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on May 08, 2020, 07:03:06 AM
(https://66.media.tumblr.com/55ca33aede906198ce504875b30c526e/b1d19539995e1919-d4/s1280x1920/eeaa8affa25810ceda73155d6d9156b46607b4d7.png)

damn that's cool as *fuck*. looks like a lot of weight to put on a big bonsai shrub, i wonder if they build supports under or what?

This isn't what I was looking for but it ended up being better anyway.

Why use fence posts when you can just use trees?


personally i hate driving nails into trees.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 08, 2020, 07:16:10 AM
personally i hate driving nails into trees.

why?
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on May 08, 2020, 09:48:05 AM
i don't want to hurt the trees! like, poison them with nails or something. Plus if the tree grows around the nail, it makes a point that will cause kickback and can hurt people when it's cut down or sawmilled.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on May 09, 2020, 12:43:18 AM
i don't want to hurt the trees! like, poison them with nails or something. Plus if the tree grows around the nail, it makes a point that will cause kickback and can hurt people when it's cut down or sawmilled.

Use aluminum nails.

Quote
The #1 thing you don’t want is for a nail or screw in your tree to rust over time. That’s why it’s best to choose stainless steel, aluminum or any other rust-proof nails and screws for your project.
https://blog.davey.com/2019/05/do-nails-screws-or-staples-hurt-trees/

Quote
some of the timber companies up here use a method of measureing trees called continuous forest inventory or CFI. they measure the same circle in the woods every x number of years. anyways they have to mark the center of the circle. they use aluminum nails. soft enough a saw of any kind will go right through them but still get the job done.
https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/best-nails-for-trees.149565/

I don't see how a nail in a tree would hurt it any more than cutting it down to make a post.  Plenty of people get their ears pierced. Trees often lose branches in storms or get holes pecked in them by birds.

Personally, I really like the idea of living structures. I want my fence posts to be alive just like I want the walls of my house to be alive. Imagine if you made a house by planting walls of bamboo and you could just keep adding more floors as it kept growing.
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: redheron on May 09, 2020, 11:54:53 AM
i don't want to hurt the trees! like, poison them with nails or something. Plus if the tree grows around the nail, it makes a point that will cause kickback and can hurt people when it's cut down or sawmilled.

Use aluminum nails.

Quote
The #1 thing you don’t want is for a nail or screw in your tree to rust over time. That’s why it’s best to choose stainless steel, aluminum or any other rust-proof nails and screws for your project.
https://blog.davey.com/2019/05/do-nails-screws-or-staples-hurt-trees/

Quote
some of the timber companies up here use a method of measureing trees called continuous forest inventory or CFI. they measure the same circle in the woods every x number of years. anyways they have to mark the center of the circle. they use aluminum nails. soft enough a saw of any kind will go right through them but still get the job done.
https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/best-nails-for-trees.149565/

I don't see how a nail in a tree would hurt it any more than cutting it down to make a post.  Plenty of people get their ears pierced. Trees often lose branches in storms or get holes pecked in them by birds.

Personally, I really like the idea of living structures. I want my fence posts to be alive just like I want the walls of my house to be alive. Imagine if you made a house by planting walls of bamboo and you could just keep adding more floors as it kept growing.
"While it may look like the work of an enormous bird, the human-sized nests below were actually made by artist Patrick Dougherty. The experienced branchbender weaves the human-sized nest houses out of living, growing trees. His works come in all shapes and sizes from houses, cocoons, pagodas, huts, giant water pitchers and even people." (https://www.huffpost.com/entry/living-art-nest-houses-ma_n_821311)
(https://inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2011/02/patrick-dougherty-art-made-of-living-trees-12.jpg)
(https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5bb177992200003501db5314.jpeg?ops=scalefit_960_noupscale)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on May 09, 2020, 01:15:06 PM
Use aluminum nails.

great idea!

(https://inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2011/02/patrick-dougherty-art-made-of-living-trees-12.jpg)
(https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5bb177992200003501db5314.jpeg?ops=scalefit_960_noupscale)

these are cool, but, surely that has to take like 20 years, right? i love this
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: woodneko on May 09, 2020, 01:42:07 PM
these are cool, but, surely that has to take like 20 years, right? i love this

I think they take already living branches or whatever and plant and weave them, so thankfully it does not take 20 years
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on June 05, 2020, 08:58:41 PM
A beautiful weed growing in a drainage ditch

(https://wiki.wetfish.net/upload/9b89e236-a499-4a62-8b75-0b7ed44ec626.jpg)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on August 17, 2020, 09:07:56 AM
this guy makes wild projects and a lot of them would fit into permaculture, like a water pumps that use the energy in a stream to pump water further

but he also makes some crazy cool stuff, like an exoskeleton that is pretty much steampunk, using winches and cables and kind of looks like a death trap, i think he put a steam engine in a pickup truck? he turned his septic drain field into a capacitor bank. his projects range from "why would you even do that" to "how did you get that to work?" to "please don't die". he's like the terry a. davis of backyard projects



anyway i only found this while looking for info on Trompe air compressors which are passive, have no moving parts, and use a falling stream to compress (and cool!) air.
Title: making cordage out of soda bottles
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on October 17, 2020, 09:07:39 PM


i think you could do some pretty long lengths if you wove them in 3-line braids
Title: Re: making cordage out of soda bottles
Post by: rachel on October 20, 2020, 06:45:29 AM


i think you could do some pretty long lengths if you wove them in 3-line braids

Interesting technique! I like how at the end you are left with a little shotglass
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: Mozai on November 21, 2020, 09:17:17 AM
vertical farming, claims to do 350x the food output per acre, with 5% of the water consumption for the same yield.  Public website https://plenty.ag/ looks ridiculous tho.
(https://www.plenty.ag/static/d87f451b3ecaa4b5a068ca4a73baf648/b0751/plenty-tigris-growroom-center.webp)
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: here cums the fuck truck on November 21, 2020, 11:34:07 AM
vertical farming, claims to do 350x the food output per acre, with 5% of the water consumption for the same yield.  Public website https://plenty.ag/ looks ridiculous tho.
(https://www.plenty.ag/static/d87f451b3ecaa4b5a068ca4a73baf648/b0751/plenty-tigris-growroom-center.webp)

yeah a $140m san francisco tech startup doing farming. that sure sounds sustainable! and permanent!!!
Title: Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
Post by: rachel on November 21, 2020, 05:55:43 PM
vertical farming, claims to do 350x the food output per acre, with 5% of the water consumption for the same yield.  Public website https://plenty.ag/ looks ridiculous tho.
(https://www.plenty.ag/static/d87f451b3ecaa4b5a068ca4a73baf648/b0751/plenty-tigris-growroom-center.webp)

What is the cost of electricity to run all those lightbulbs though?