Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture

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Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #60 on: May 09, 2020, 12:43:18 AM »
i don't want to hurt the trees! like, poison them with nails or something. Plus if the tree grows around the nail, it makes a point that will cause kickback and can hurt people when it's cut down or sawmilled.

Use aluminum nails.

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The #1 thing you don’t want is for a nail or screw in your tree to rust over time. That’s why it’s best to choose stainless steel, aluminum or any other rust-proof nails and screws for your project.
https://blog.davey.com/2019/05/do-nails-screws-or-staples-hurt-trees/

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some of the timber companies up here use a method of measureing trees called continuous forest inventory or CFI. they measure the same circle in the woods every x number of years. anyways they have to mark the center of the circle. they use aluminum nails. soft enough a saw of any kind will go right through them but still get the job done.
https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/best-nails-for-trees.149565/

I don't see how a nail in a tree would hurt it any more than cutting it down to make a post.  Plenty of people get their ears pierced. Trees often lose branches in storms or get holes pecked in them by birds.

Personally, I really like the idea of living structures. I want my fence posts to be alive just like I want the walls of my house to be alive. Imagine if you made a house by planting walls of bamboo and you could just keep adding more floors as it kept growing.
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #61 on: May 09, 2020, 11:54:53 AM »
i don't want to hurt the trees! like, poison them with nails or something. Plus if the tree grows around the nail, it makes a point that will cause kickback and can hurt people when it's cut down or sawmilled.

Use aluminum nails.

Quote
The #1 thing you don’t want is for a nail or screw in your tree to rust over time. That’s why it’s best to choose stainless steel, aluminum or any other rust-proof nails and screws for your project.
https://blog.davey.com/2019/05/do-nails-screws-or-staples-hurt-trees/

Quote
some of the timber companies up here use a method of measureing trees called continuous forest inventory or CFI. they measure the same circle in the woods every x number of years. anyways they have to mark the center of the circle. they use aluminum nails. soft enough a saw of any kind will go right through them but still get the job done.
https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/best-nails-for-trees.149565/

I don't see how a nail in a tree would hurt it any more than cutting it down to make a post.  Plenty of people get their ears pierced. Trees often lose branches in storms or get holes pecked in them by birds.

Personally, I really like the idea of living structures. I want my fence posts to be alive just like I want the walls of my house to be alive. Imagine if you made a house by planting walls of bamboo and you could just keep adding more floors as it kept growing.
"While it may look like the work of an enormous bird, the human-sized nests below were actually made by artist Patrick Dougherty. The experienced branchbender weaves the human-sized nest houses out of living, growing trees. His works come in all shapes and sizes from houses, cocoons, pagodas, huts, giant water pitchers and even people."

🎷🐕

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #62 on: May 09, 2020, 01:15:06 PM »
Use aluminum nails.

great idea!




these are cool, but, surely that has to take like 20 years, right? i love this

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #63 on: May 09, 2020, 01:42:07 PM »
these are cool, but, surely that has to take like 20 years, right? i love this

I think they take already living branches or whatever and plant and weave them, so thankfully it does not take 20 years
,i remain

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #64 on: June 05, 2020, 08:58:41 PM »
A beautiful weed growing in a drainage ditch

*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #65 on: August 17, 2020, 09:07:56 AM »
this guy makes wild projects and a lot of them would fit into permaculture, like a water pumps that use the energy in a stream to pump water further

but he also makes some crazy cool stuff, like an exoskeleton that is pretty much steampunk, using winches and cables and kind of looks like a death trap, i think he put a steam engine in a pickup truck? he turned his septic drain field into a capacitor bank. his projects range from "why would you even do that" to "how did you get that to work?" to "please don't die". he's like the terry a. davis of backyard projects



anyway i only found this while looking for info on Trompe air compressors which are passive, have no moving parts, and use a falling stream to compress (and cool!) air.

making cordage out of soda bottles
« Reply #66 on: October 17, 2020, 09:07:39 PM »


i think you could do some pretty long lengths if you wove them in 3-line braids

Re: making cordage out of soda bottles
« Reply #67 on: October 20, 2020, 06:45:29 AM »


i think you could do some pretty long lengths if you wove them in 3-line braids

Interesting technique! I like how at the end you are left with a little shotglass
*spork*

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #68 on: November 21, 2020, 09:17:17 AM »
vertical farming, claims to do 350x the food output per acre, with 5% of the water consumption for the same yield.  Public website https://plenty.ag/ looks ridiculous tho.

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #69 on: November 21, 2020, 11:34:07 AM »
vertical farming, claims to do 350x the food output per acre, with 5% of the water consumption for the same yield.  Public website https://plenty.ag/ looks ridiculous tho.


yeah a $140m san francisco tech startup doing farming. that sure sounds sustainable! and permanent!!!

Re: Permaculture, a permanent sustainable culture
« Reply #70 on: November 21, 2020, 05:55:43 PM »
vertical farming, claims to do 350x the food output per acre, with 5% of the water consumption for the same yield.  Public website https://plenty.ag/ looks ridiculous tho.


What is the cost of electricity to run all those lightbulbs though?
*spork*